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Life is too short to eat bad food! Sharing great recipes, farm life, stories and photography from our Northern California dairy farm.

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December 20, 2010

Are Carbs Making Us Fat or is Fat Making Us Fat?











Carbs, not fat, are making us overweight.  I was reading an article in the L.A. Times where Dr. Walter Willett, chairman of the department of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health states:

"Fat is not the problem."  He also says, "If Americans could eliminate sugary beverages, potatoes, white bread, pasta, white rice and sugary snacks, we would wipe out almost all the problems we have with weight and diabetes and other metabolic diseases."

Years ago when the Atkins diet became popular, we learned that reducing carbs results in weight loss.  I don't diet at all, nor do I believe in cutting all carbs from my food consumption, but I try to eat and feed my family as healthy as possible.  Our typical food intake, here at home consists of our home raised beef, lots of fruits and veggies, some whole grain pasta {but not too much because my kids do not like pasta}, whole grain bread, eggs, dairy and of course we do indulge in the occasional cookie and cake once in a while......okay, more than once in while this time of year. 

About a year and a half ago, when we began drinking our own raw milk from the dairy, I stopped buying non-fat milk for myself and began drinking the whole milk with my cereal and coffee instead.  I thought, well, if I start packing on the lbs., I'll go back to drinking non-fat milk.  For the last year and a half, I have consumed the same amount of milk as when I was drinking the nonfat milk and not one pound was gained within this time.   I guess the way we eat, here at home, proves to me what I was hoping for, eating real, whole foods such as fresh, local produce in season, minimally or non processed foods for the most part, beef, chicken, fish, butter instead of margarine, olive oil to cook with, and everything in moderation {including carbs}with some exercise thrown in the mix and we'll be just fine.  This way of eating works well for my family's health and metabolism.


Also according to the article:
Americans, on average, eat 250 to 300 grams of carbs a day, accounting for about 55% of their caloric intake. The most conservative recommendations say they should eat half that amount. Consumption of carbohydrates has increased over the years with the help of a 30-year-old, government-mandated message to cut fat.


And the nation's levels of obesity, Type 2 diabetes and heart disease have risen. "The country's big low-fat message backfired," says Dr. Frank Hu, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. "The overemphasis on reducing fat caused the consumption of carbohydrates and sugar in our diets to soar. That shift may be linked to the biggest health problems in America today."


What do you think is making America fat?


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